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Energy Efficient Products

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Use your compressed air to blow, vent, dry, cool, and exhaust efficiently to reduce noise and energy

Vortex Tube & Industrial Cooling

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Convert your compressed air to very cold air (as low as minus 40 degrees) for industrial spot cooling

Pneumatic Conveyor products

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Convey solid materials, waste, trim, small parts with virtually no moving parts

Air Optimization

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Save money by optimizing your compressed air system and spot leakages

Static Control

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Prevent static charges in production that cause personnel shocks, dirt buildup, and machine jam ups

Accessories

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Accessories to enhance the installation and operation of our other products

Our Clients

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Nex Flow Air Products Corp. Prides itself in being proactive Not Reactive – One step further than the others! We not only solve customer compressed air problems but also recommend and assist where they can prevent problems from occurring.

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Feature of the day

HOMETool Coolers are utilized for dry machining applications.  The Tool Cooler is essentially a “Packaged vortex tube”, preset to give you optimum cooling effect at the outlet.   The temperature at the outlet is just above 0 degrees C. which also happens to provide the best flow output for maximum BTU/hr. cooling effect from the outlet air.  This cold air is blown onto the cutting tool.  “Dry machining” is increasing in use due to the nature of more exotic materials used for machining, better tooling and improved dry machining techniques and driven by the increasing pressure to improve the working and overall environment and the increasing cost of disposal of used cutting fluids and lubricant

In addition, many materials cannot use cutting fluids and must be dry machined.  Tool coolers can be used when machining plastics, glass ceramics, and materials such as titanium.

In tool grinding and sharpening, the Nex Flow Tool Cooler can eliminate micro carbide heat cracking and tool edge burning.  As a result, tool life is dramatically increased.

In milling and drilling, the Nex Flow™ Tool Cooler can cool fly cutters up to 460 mm in diameter.  Be removing the heat with the tool cooler tool life can be extended while allowing for increased speeds and feeds and even improving the finish.

Laser cutting is an excellent application for the Nex Flow™ Tool Cooler.  The cold air from the unit cools the laser cut part so it can be handled quickly after the cut.  Usually a higher air flow Tool Cooler is used which gives added cooling capacity, cooling the part is seconds.  Faster handling means faster production and output.

Special Tool Coolers can be provided with colder temperatures if necessary for some applications where temperature is important.  This would be applicable sometimes to ceramic cutting and also for chill roll cooling. Cooling a chill roll with cold air close to (minus) 10 degrees C air keeps the material on the surface from bunching up jamming or tearing.  The metal surface of the chill roll transfers the cold temperature applied to the product.    Many other applications for spot cooling are available: cooling sewing machine needles for example in heavy textile production (jeans, burlap, carpet material, grommets onto heavy bags, etc.).

Even though they use compressed air, vortex tubes and their packaged versions like the Nex Flow™ Tool Coolers offer advantages that make them popular for spot cooling.   They have no moving parts, use no electricity nor chemicals like HCFC’s, they are small and lightweight, low in cost, maintenance free, durable, with adjustable temperature and flow and almost instant cold.

When using a vortex tube or any device made from a vortex tube such as tool coolers, mini coolers, and panel coolers, you need to be aware of certain conditions.   First and foremost is filtration.  The compressed air supply should be clean.  A minimum of 25 micron filtration or less is recommended to remove moisture.  If there is oil in the air lines an oil removal filter is also recommended.   The second factor to consider is back pressure on the cold air exhaust from the vortex tube.   Low back pressure up to 2 PSIG has negligible effect on performance.  If it is up to 5 PSIG it will change performance by raising the outlet temperature about 5 drees F (2.8 C).   Backpressure in supplying the compressed air to the vortex tube or vortex tube operated device is also something to be aware of.  If the supply lines are too small for the input flow, then the vortex tube will be operating at a lower pressure and therefore will produce less of a temperature drop.   For best performance, the line pressure should be 80 to 110 PSIG (5.5 bar to 7.6 bar).   You require a minimum of 20 PSIG (1.4 bar) for any significant cooling to take place.

Any vortex tube or vortex tube operated device produces a temperature drop from the inlet air temperature.  If the inlet air temperature rises, the corresponding outlet temperature will rise approximately the same amount.

The vortex tube was actually discovered by accident in 1928 by George Ranque, a physics student in France.  He was experimenting with a vortex type of pump he had built when he noticed warm air coming from one end, and cold air out the other end.   Noticing these results he started a small company to use this newly discovered effect.   Unfortunately his company failed and the vortex tube disappeared from general knowledge until 1945 when Rudolph Hilsch, a German physicist published a scientific paper on the vortex tube which was widely read.

Long before this time, the 19th century physicist James Maxwell wrote that since heat involves the movement of molecules, that we might be able to get hot and cold air from the same device with the help of a “friendly little demon” to sort and  separate the hot and the cold molecules of air.  Then came the vortex tube with the mysterious demon inside!!

That is why the vortex tube is also called the Ranque Vortex Tube, the Hilsch Tube and Maxwells Demon tube.

Nex Flow™  Air Products Corp. strives to inform, educate and improve factory operations related to compressed air use to improve productivity, optimize energy use and enhance safety in the work place.

Click here to Learn More About Tool Coolers …..

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Feature of the day

HOMETool Coolers are utilized for dry machining applications.  The Tool Cooler is essentially a “Packaged vortex tube”, preset to give you optimum cooling effect at the outlet.   The temperature at the outlet is just above 0 degrees C. which also happens to provide the best flow output for maximum BTU/hr. cooling effect from the outlet air.  This cold air is blown onto the cutting tool.  “Dry machining” is increasing in use due to the nature of more exotic materials used for machining, better tooling and improved dry machining techniques and driven by the increasing pressure to improve the working and overall environment and the increasing cost of disposal of used cutting fluids and lubricant

In addition, many materials cannot use cutting fluids and must be dry machined.  Tool coolers can be used when machining plastics, glass ceramics, and materials such as titanium.

In tool grinding and sharpening, the Nex Flow Tool Cooler can eliminate micro carbide heat cracking and tool edge burning.  As a result, tool life is dramatically increased.

In milling and drilling, the Nex Flow™ Tool Cooler can cool fly cutters up to 460 mm in diameter.  Be removing the heat with the tool cooler tool life can be extended while allowing for increased speeds and feeds and even improving the finish.

Laser cutting is an excellent application for the Nex Flow™ Tool Cooler.  The cold air from the unit cools the laser cut part so it can be handled quickly after the cut.  Usually a higher air flow Tool Cooler is used which gives added cooling capacity, cooling the part is seconds.  Faster handling means faster production and output.

Special Tool Coolers can be provided with colder temperatures if necessary for some applications where temperature is important.  This would be applicable sometimes to ceramic cutting and also for chill roll cooling. Cooling a chill roll with cold air close to (minus) 10 degrees C air keeps the material on the surface from bunching up jamming or tearing.  The metal surface of the chill roll transfers the cold temperature applied to the product.    Many other applications for spot cooling are available: cooling sewing machine needles for example in heavy textile production (jeans, burlap, carpet material, grommets onto heavy bags, etc.).

Even though they use compressed air, vortex tubes and their packaged versions like the Nex Flow™ Tool Coolers offer advantages that make them popular for spot cooling.   They have no moving parts, use no electricity nor chemicals like HCFC’s, they are small and lightweight, low in cost, maintenance free, durable, with adjustable temperature and flow and almost instant cold.

When using a vortex tube or any device made from a vortex tube such as tool coolers, mini coolers, and panel coolers, you need to be aware of certain conditions.   First and foremost is filtration.  The compressed air supply should be clean.  A minimum of 25 micron filtration or less is recommended to remove moisture.  If there is oil in the air lines an oil removal filter is also recommended.   The second factor to consider is back pressure on the cold air exhaust from the vortex tube.   Low back pressure up to 2 PSIG has negligible effect on performance.  If it is up to 5 PSIG it will change performance by raising the outlet temperature about 5 drees F (2.8 C).   Backpressure in supplying the compressed air to the vortex tube or vortex tube operated device is also something to be aware of.  If the supply lines are too small for the input flow, then the vortex tube will be operating at a lower pressure and therefore will produce less of a temperature drop.   For best performance, the line pressure should be 80 to 110 PSIG (5.5 bar to 7.6 bar).   You require a minimum of 20 PSIG (1.4 bar) for any significant cooling to take place.

Any vortex tube or vortex tube operated device produces a temperature drop from the inlet air temperature.  If the inlet air temperature rises, the corresponding outlet temperature will rise approximately the same amount.

The vortex tube was actually discovered by accident in 1928 by George Ranque, a physics student in France.  He was experimenting with a vortex type of pump he had built when he noticed warm air coming from one end, and cold air out the other end.   Noticing these results he started a small company to use this newly discovered effect.   Unfortunately his company failed and the vortex tube disappeared from general knowledge until 1945 when Rudolph Hilsch, a German physicist published a scientific paper on the vortex tube which was widely read.

Long before this time, the 19th century physicist James Maxwell wrote that since heat involves the movement of molecules, that we might be able to get hot and cold air from the same device with the help of a “friendly little demon” to sort and  separate the hot and the cold molecules of air.  Then came the vortex tube with the mysterious demon inside!!

That is why the vortex tube is also called the Ranque Vortex Tube, the Hilsch Tube and Maxwells Demon tube.

Nex Flow™  Air Products Corp. strives to inform, educate and improve factory operations related to compressed air use to improve productivity, optimize energy use and enhance safety in the work place.

Click here to Learn More About Tool Coolers …..

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